Smart Irrigation Month

JULY – Smart Irrigation Month

 

Smart Irrigation Month was launched in 2005 by the Irrigation Association, in hopes that they would increase awareness of the value of water use and promote better irrigation practices. It’s important to use water wisely so that we can meet the needs of future demands. Not only does being water wise benefit the future population it can save you money on your water bill!

Water Smart Tips

Plant Right

Saving water doesn’t have to involve the cost and inconvenience of tearing up your yard to install a new irrigation system. It’s easy to save water and reduce your utility bills with simple changes to your landscaping and gardening routine.

Landscape to suit your lot. Choose grass or plants that have low water requirements and will thrive in your local climate. Consider your lot’s exact features, including sun and shade, dry and damp areas, plant size, and how you plan to use each section of your yard.

Keep soil healthy. Aerating your lawn and around trees at least once a year helps improve water penetration. When planting, turn and cultivate the soil and add compost or fertilizer to improve moisture retention and grow healthier plants that need less water to stay strong.

Mulch well around plants, bushes and trees. Using 2 to 4 inches of mulch reduces evaporation, moderates spikes and lows in soil temperatures, improves water penetration and helps control weeds that compete for water.

“Hydro-zone” your yard. Grouping plants with similar moisture needs in the same area makes it easier to make sure they get the water they need without overwatering. Separate plants from grassy areas, which have different water requirements.

Plant in spring or fall. Avoid summer, when hotter temperatures mean plants need more water to become established.

Save grass for functional areas. Plant grass in play zones and other areas where it will be used and enjoyed. Instead of planting turf on sleep slopes or other hard-to-water spaces, consider ground cover, perimeter plants or mulch.

Plant shade trees. The shade they cast creates natural “air-conditioning,” lowering air and soil temperatures, and reducing soil moisture loss.

Maintain your yard regularly. A well-maintained yard requires less water, so weed, prune and mow as needed.

Invest in an irrigation system

Using an automated irrigation system is one of the best ways to keep your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste. Plan carefully for a reliable, flexible irrigation system that can grow and evolve along with your landscaping.

Use components that provide flexibility. Different plants have different watering needs, and these needs may change over time. Your system should allow you to apply the right amount of water for each type of plant by the most effective method.

Install excess capacity. Irrigation zones are areas that are watered by the same irrigation valve and plumbing. Installing extra connections now makes it easier and less expensive to expand your irrigation system later.

Think smart. Include “smart” controls that automatically adjust watering based on rain, soil moisture, evaporation and plant water use.

Check water pressure. Low or high pressure can seriously affect sprinkler performance; choose sprinklers based on the water pressure on your site.

Buy the best. Use the best components you can afford to minimize future maintenance and total lifetime cost of your system.

Meet code requirements. Include the right backflow prevention device for your area. Required by the National Plumbing Code for all irrigation systems, backflow prevention devices prevent irrigation system water from contaminating the water supply.

Dig deep. Install lines deep enough to protect them from damage from aeration and other lawn maintenance. Before you dig make sure to call “811” to have a professional come out to find and locate utilities in the ground.

Hire carefully. Even the best irrigation system won’t perform well if installed incorrectly. When looking to hire a designer or contractor, always get multiple bids, check references and confirm all vendors are insured.

Water Wisely

Today’s irrigation systems include sophisticated controllers that allow you to easily adjust watering schedules to fit different needs.

Get in the zone. Schedule each individual zone in your irrigation system to account for type of sprinkler, sun or shade exposure, and soil in that section. Different zones will almost always need different watering schedules.

Consider soil type. Type of soil determines how quickly water can be absorbed without runoff. Watering more than soil can absorb causes runoff and waste.

Don’t send water down the drain. Set sprinklers to water plants, not your driveway, sidewalk, patio or buildings.

Water only when needed. Saturate root zones and let the soil dry. Watering too much and too frequently results in shallow roots, weed growth, disease and fungus.

Water at the best time. Watering during the heat of the day may cause losses of up to 30 percent due to evaporation. Prevent water loss by watering when the sun is low or down, winds are calm and temperatures are cool — typically between the evening and early morning.

Water more often for shorter periods. For example, setting your system to run for three, 5-minute intervals lets soil absorb more water than watering for 15 minutes at one time, reducing runoff.

Adapt watering to the season. Familiarize yourself with the settings on your irrigation controller and adjust the watering schedule regularly based on seasonal weather conditions. Or invest in a smart controller so your system can make these changes automatically.

Maintain and Upgrade

Irrigation systems need regular maintenance to keep them working efficiently year after year. Damage from lawn equipment or improper winterization can cause leaks and other serious problems.

Inspect your system monthly. Check for leaks, broken or clogged sprinkler heads, and other problems. Clean clogged screens and micro-irrigation filters as needed.

Adjust sprinkler heads. Remove or correct obstructions that prevent sprinklers from distributing water evenly. Adjust sprinkler head positions and spray patterns to avoid watering sidewalks or structures and to provide necessary clearance over growing plants.

Check the pressure. Pressure can change over time and negatively affect system efficiency.

Inspect the system for leaks. Leaks are a huge water waster. A good contractor can perform regular maintenance checks for leaks, broken or clogged spray heads, and other problems. Ask them to show you common problems to watch for between visits.

Install a rain shutoff switch. These inexpensive sensors can be retrofitted to almost any system and help compensate for natural rainfall by turning off your system in rainy weather.

Consider “smart” technology. Climate or soil moisture sensor-based controllers evaluate weather or soil moisture conditions and then automatically adjust the irrigation schedule to meet the specific needs of your landscape.

Consider low volume, micro-irrigation for gardens, trees and shrubs. Drip (or trickle) irrigation, micro spray jets, micro-sprinklers and bubbler irrigation all apply a very small amount of water, slowly and precisely, minimizing evaporation, runoff and overspray.

Have your system audited. Hire a professional to conduct an irrigation audit and uniformity test to verify areas are being watered evenly and appropriately, and make necessary adjustments.

Winterize in colder climates. An irrigation contractor with specialized equipment will flush out water that could freeze and crack pipes, valves and sprinklers.

Water Smart Articles

How to Hire a Reliable, Certified Irrigation Professional

When a man feels unwell, he goes to an expert on assessing the body: a doctor. The doctor has the experience, knowledge, training, certifications and licensing that qualify him to present an informed and accurate solution to the man’s problem.

As such, when you’re searching for an irrigation professional to install a system into the yard, help conserve water, or maintain or renovate an existing irrigation system, you should go to an exterior water expert: a reliable, certified irrigation professional.

As a consumer, you have the right to conduct thorough research to ensure the professional you hire will perform the job to the standards and quality you expect and deserve.

Use this guide to determine the qualifications and relevance of each irrigation professional you interview.

Qualifications
Start by assessing the professional’s qualifications. A reliable, certified irrigation professional should be able to tell you about his or her formal training, references, certification by the Irrigation Association and contractor’s license. These items show a contractor has demonstrated basic knowledge and skills required for the job.

Plus, IA certification means the contractor has passed exams that demonstrate in-depth knowledge of proper irrigation practices, as well as a continued interest and dedication to the subject matter through continuing education and renewal of the required certification. Other qualified organizations that offer proper irrigation training include irrigation equipment manufacturers, colleges and trade schools. A contractor should be able to readily provide proof of professional certifications, training and any state or local government-required licensing. A contractor should also have a basic business license.

A professional irrigation business should also be able to discuss with you how it provides safety training and education for its employees to ensure they perform their work in a safe and consistent fashion.

Belonging to various trade associations also shows a contractor’s commitment to the industry and desire to keep up with technological advancements and irrigation standards and trends.

Insurance
Reputable and reliable irrigation professionals will carry appropriate insurance policies to protect you and your property. These include worker’s compensation insurance to protect you from potential liability if one of the contractor’s working on your property gets hurt while on the job, and general liability insurance with limits between $300,000 and $500,000 for residential work to protect you in case of unexpected and unintentional problems on your property like flooding or landslides. Any professional, reliable irrigation contractor should be able to provide you with certificates of insurance.

Bids and Contracts
When seeking a professional irrigation contractor, obtain more than one bid so you can compare prices and work offered. Request all bids in writing and make sure they include the same details, such as irrigation product brands. The lowest price is not always a sign of the best contractor. The required licensing and certification does cost more for a contractor, and obtaining these documents make him or her more qualified to do the work.

When you do choose a contractor, insist on a written contract for your protection that includes proper identification including names and licensing numbers, a complete description of the work to be done and materials to be used, payment arrangements, details on product or work guarantees, approximate date when the work will be completed, and a statement saying the contractor will cleanup and remove debris after the job is finished. If any changes are made, ensure they are made in writing as well.

Expert Knowledge
Most importantly, an irrigation professional should have in-depth knowledge of how to properly assess the water needs of your property, how to design an efficient system that saves you water (applying only what’s necessary) and how to educate you on proper system use for maximum benefits. A contractor should be able to detail approximate water requirements for your specific property, provide rain/soil sensors to avoid overwatering and describe how the system will be split into zones targeted for each area and for maximum coverage and minimum – if any – unnecessary runoff.

A smart irrigation system is only as smart as the professional who installs it and then the customer who uses it. Get smart today and hire a reliable, certified irrigation professional!

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Provided for The Irrigation Association by Landscape Management magazine.

Smart Irrigation: Technologies that Use Water Efficiently

July is Smart Irrigation Month, and the start of summer is a great time to improve the efficiency of your outdoor irrigation system or install a water-efficient automatic irrigation system. There are many “smart” technologies available today that allow you to maintain beautiful landscapes while maximizing water efficiency. Here are some to consider whether you do it yourself or through a professional contractor.

Rain/Freeze Sensors
Rain sensors prevent irrigation systems from running when it is raining and right after rain events when irrigation is unnecessary. Rain/freeze sensors add the ability to stop irrigation when temperatures approach freezing to prevent ice on landscapes and hardscapes. These devices can reduce irrigation water usage up to 35 percent and help extend irrigation system life. Sprinkler systems should never run in the rain, and rain sensors can put an end to those wasteful and embarrassing situations.

Weather-based Controllers
Weather-based controllers actually adjust irrigation schedules based on local weather conditions. These climate-based systems gather local weather information and some even factor in your exact landscape (types of plants, soils, slopes, etc.) to make irrigation run-time adjustments so your landscape always receives the appropriate amount of water. There is a wide range of products in this category with various weather input options and landscape-specific adjustment factors. The water savings can be substantial and the convenience of these self-adjusting controllers is another great benefit.

Sensor-based Controllers
Sensor-based controllers rely on soil moisture sensors placed below ground in the root zones of lawns and landscapes to determine if and how long to water. Soils may be maintained between lower and upper target moisture levels for optimal plant health. Alternatively, a simpler decision is to schedule the regular irrigation program to run based on the soil moisture. Weather-based and sensor-based control products are available as stand-alone controllers or add-on devices to existing controllers. Each has been shown to reduce irrigation water usage up to 70 percent without sacrificing the quality of your landscaping.

Pressure Regulation
All sprinklers operate best at a certain water pressure. At those pressures the water distribution is most uniform over the target area. That allows shorter run times because for an entire lawn to be green you basically end up setting a schedule to provide sufficient water to the driest spot. Reducing high pressure also eliminates problems such as misting sprinklers and potential irrigation system damage. And for every 5-point reduction in water pressure you actually use 6 to 8 percent less water. Those savings can add up quickly. Water pressure regulation devices are easily added to valves to control a whole irrigation zone or can be added to individual sprinklers.

Low Precipitation Rate and High-Efficiency Nozzles
Many great sprinkler nozzles are on the market today that use lower precipitation rates to reduce run-off or offer improved water distribution uniformity. Distribution uniformity is very important to reducing watering run times. Again, you want the entire area being watered to receive sufficient water to maintain green lawns and colorful plants, so the more uniform the water distribution, the shorter the watering run time will be for the driest spot. Be sure to inquire about these critical considerations when selecting sprinklers and nozzles.

Drip Irrigation
Drip irrigation systems are very different from pop-up sprinkler systems. Rather than spraying wide areas, they generally utilize point emitters to deliver desired volumes of water to particular locations at or near plant root zones. Water drips slowly from emitters either onto the soil surface or below ground. Less water is lost to wind and evaporation as a result, and weeds can also be reduced. Drip irrigation systems are very water-efficient and customizable for even different plants in a small area.

All of these water-efficient products can reduce water use and your water bills without sacrificing plant and landscape health. You can still enjoy all of the benefits associated with attractive and enjoyable landscapes on your property while helping to conserve a precious natural resource. Please take advantage of these cost-saving ideas that are good for you and good for the planet.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Provided for the Irrigation Association by Rain Bird Corporation

Complementing Your Smart Irrigation System with Sustainable Solutions

You’ve hired a certified landscape irrigation auditor to conduct a site inspection and irrigation system audit. You’ve discussed the findings, identified opportunities for potential water savings, and completed the appropriate system enhancements, repairs and upgrades with new water-saving technologies based on the system evaluation.

Your irrigation system is outfitted with check valves, water-efficient rotating sprinklers or low-volume drip irrigation, a smart controller or soil moisture sensor, and a rain sensor. You’ve implemented a regular system maintenance strategy to ensure proper adjustments, run times and seasonal changes take place. You’re all set – with a top of the line, truly “smart” irrigation system that is running at peak efficiency, saving water and money on your water bill. Now what?

There are plenty of additional considerations you can explore to complement your smart irrigation system and contribute toward a truly sustainable landscape.

• Permeable pavers. An alternative to concrete or asphalt surfaces, permeable pavers allow rainwater to filter naturally down into the underlying soil to recharge valuable groundwater aquifers. They help prevent flooding and protect the quality of our water supplies by eliminating pollutant-laden runoff from entering natural waterways.

• Rainwater harvesting. Rainwater harvesting refers to the capture and storage of water, which can then be used as a supplemental water source for irrigating a landscape. Rainwater harvesting can take many forms, including above-ground rain barrels or cisterns, below-grade catchments or combined systems that incorporate simple or advanced water features. Be sure to check local regulations before exploring this option.

• LED lighting. LED technology, or light emitting diode, is the most efficient light source available, rivaling halogen in brilliance and intensity at one-fifth of the wattage. Though not suitable for all applications, the lamp life rating is excellent – upwards of 80,000 hours.

• Green walls. A vertical, vegetative “living wall,” a green wall can be freestanding or part of a building and can help reduce the overall temperature of the building, improve the aesthetics and can even aid in water reuse, purification and retention.

• Soil testing. Submit a soil sample to a testing laboratory for an inexpensive report explaining its balance of nutrients, which will assist with selecting the appropriate fertilizer and application rate.

• Aerification, amendments and mulch. Implementing a regular aerification schedule and base layer of organic matter or calcined clay products will aid in water and nutrient retention and allow deeper infiltration into the soil profile to promote deeper root growth and help plants resist disease and better withstand drought conditions.

• Slow-release fertilizer. The use of coated, slow-release fertilizers, which have lower salt indexes than other quickly-available nitrogen fertilizers, means less watering when compared to their non-coated counterpart products.

• Fertilizer injection systems (fertigation). Fertigation, derived from the combination of fertilization and irrigation, allows you to fertilize and irrigate a section of turf in one simple step, making it easier for nutrients to infiltrate plant root zones and eliminating the need for watering above and beyond the irrigation system’s scheduled program run time.

For more information on these or other complementary solutions, consult your local landscape supplies distributor, or find a Certified Professional near you by visiting the Irrigation Association’s web site at http://www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Provided for the Irrigation Association by Ewing Irrigation Products, Inc.

Don’t Send Money Down the Drain Water Smart & Save Money This Summer

Most homeowners overwater their yard, unintentionally wasting money every time they take out the hose or turn on the sprinklers. To raise awareness of the benefits of efficient watering practices, the Irrigation Association has named July Smart Irrigation Month.

Using an automated irrigation system is one of the best ways to keep your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste. Make time this summer to be sure you’re getting the most out of your irrigation system, while keeping utility bills low and helping to protect the environment.

Smart Start

Creating an efficient irrigation system requires specialized knowledge and understanding of irrigation design principles and local environmental conditions — something most weekend gardeners don’t have. Complying with local installation codes is another consideration.

Even the best irrigation design won’t perform well if installed incorrectly or using inferior components. Something as simple as selecting the correct type of pipe can mean the difference between a system that lasts and one that requires ongoing repairs.

Hiring a certified or licensed irrigation professional and insisting on high-quality components is the smart way to make sure your system will operate at peak efficiency for years to come. Always get multiple bids, check references and confirm your preferred vendor is properly insured.

Smart Planning & Planting

Guarantee long-term satisfaction with your irrigation system with up-front planning.

• Work with a certified irrigation designer or contractor who has experience in your local area.
• Consider local climate conditions, as well as your lot’s exact features. Choose appropriate turf and plant species that have low water requirements.
• Group plants with similar water needs close together and separate lawn areas from planting beds.
• Plan your irrigation zones carefully. Be sure that your system will have enough capacity, now and in the future. The more irrigation zones you plan, the more you can tailor watering even if you modify landscaping.
• Consult with your local water provider to see if rebates are available for water-efficient products.
• Check the on-site water pressure and select appropriate sprinklers. Low or high water pressure can seriously affect sprinkler performance.
• Include “smart” controls that automatically adjust watering based on rain, soil moisture, evaporation and plant water use.
• Use quality components to minimize future maintenance needs and total lifetime cost of your system.

Smart Installation

Use components that provide the greatest flexibility. Different plants have different watering needs, and these needs may change over time. Your system should allow you to apply the right amount of water for each type of plant by the most effective method.

• Always install excess irrigation zone capacity. Irrigation zones are areas that are watered by the same irrigation valve and plumbing. Installing extra connections now makes it easier and less expensive to expand your irrigation system later.
• Include the right backflow prevention device as required by the plumbing codes for all irrigation systems. Backflow prevention devices prevent irrigation system water from contaminating the water supply.
• Install lines deep enough to protect them from damage from aeration and other lawn maintenance.

Smart Scheduling & Watering

Today’s irrigation controllers allow you to easily adjust your system’s watering schedule to fit different watering needs.

• Schedule each individual zone in your irrigation system to account for sun, shade and wind exposure.
• Consider soil type, which affects the how quickly water can be applied and absorbed without runoff.
• Make sure you’re not sending water down the drain. Set sprinklers to water plants, not your driveway, sidewalk, patio or buildings.
• Water at the right time of day. Watering when the sun is low, winds are calm and temperatures are cooler minimizes evaporation by as much as 30 percent. The best time to water is during early morning hours.
• Thoroughly soak the root zone (generally within the top six inches of soil for lawns), then let the soil dry. Watering too frequently results in shallow roots and encourages weed growth, disease and fungus.
• Reduce runoff by watering each zone more often for shorter periods. For example, setting your system to run for three, 5-minute intervals with some soak time lets water infiltrate the soil better than watering for 15 minutes at one time.
• Adjust your watering schedule regularly to account for seasonal weather conditions, plant size and other factors. Monthly (or even weekly) adjustments keep plants healthy without overwatering.

Smart Maintenance & Upgrades

Irrigation systems need regular maintenance to keep them working efficiently year after year. Damage from lawn equipment or improper winterization can cause leaks and other serious problems.

• Inspect the system for leaks, broken or clogged sprinkler heads or other damaged components.
• Check that sprinkler heads are high enough to clear plants that may have grown taller since the system was installed.
• Adjust spray patterns and positions to make sure they aren’t watering “hardscapes” like sidewalks and buildings.
• Evaluate pressure and adjust as needed so sprinklers work optimally to distribute the water.
• Retrofit the system with a rain or soil moisture sensor to prevent overwatering. Rain sensors stop the system from operating when it rains; soil moisture sensors use long metal probes to measure moisture at the root zone and turn off the system when no additional water is needed. Weather-based controllers automatically adjust the irrigation schedule as weather conditions change.
• Before upgrading your system, check to see if your local water provider offers rebates on any products you are considering.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Fine-Tune Your Irrigation System Save Money & See Better Results

Automated irrigation systems offer convenience while protecting your landscape investment. A well-maintained system keeps your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste.

To raise awareness of the benefits of efficient watering practices, the Irrigation Association has named July Smart Irrigation Month. Make time this summer to be sure you’re getting the most out of your irrigation system, while keeping utility bills low and helping to protect the environment.

• Adapt your watering schedule to the weather and the season. Familiarize yourself with the settings on your irrigation controller and adjust the watering schedule regularly.

• Schedule watering for each zone separately. For each area, take into account type of sprinkler, sun or shade exposure, soil type and plant requirements.

• Inspect your system monthly. Check for leaks, broken or clogged heads, and other problems, or engage a certified irrigation professional to regularly check your system. Clean microirrigation filters as needed.

• Adjust sprinkler heads. Remove obstructions that prevent sprinklers from distributing water evenly and make sure you’re watering plants, not sidewalks or buildings.

• Have your system audited. Hire a professional to conduct an irrigation audit and uniformity test to make sure each zone is being watered evenly.

• Install an inexpensive rain shutoff switch. Required by law in many states, these money-saving sensors prevent watering in rainy weather and can be retrofitted to almost any system.

• Consider “smart” technology. Climate or soil moisture sensor-based controllers evaluate weather or soil moisture conditions and then automatically adjust the watering schedule to meet the specific needs of your landscape.

• Think about low-volume drip irrigation for plant beds. Install microirrigation for gardens, trees and shrubs to minimize evaporation and runoff. Options include drip (also known as trickle), micro-spray jets, micro-sprinklers and bubbler irrigation.

• Water at the right time of day. Watering when the sun is low, winds are calm and temperatures are cooler minimizes evaporation by as much as 30 percent. The best times to water are late afternoon, evening and just before sunrise.

• Water more often for shorter periods. Setting your system to run for three, 5-minute intervals lets soil absorb more water than watering for 15 minutes at one time.

• Water only when needed. Saturate root zones and let the soil dry. Overwatering results in shallow roots and encourages weeds, disease and fungus growth.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.

Smart Irrigation Systems A Greener Idea

If you’re a typical homeowner, you probably put your automatic sprinkler system into the same category as your home’s heating and cooling system. You expect it to work reliably and efficiently with minimum fuss. The latest technology offers just that — and more.

Automated irrigation systems offer convenience while protecting your landscape investment. A well-maintained system keeps your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste.

To raise awareness of the benefits of efficient watering practices, the Irrigation Association has named July Smart Irrigation Month. Make time this summer to be sure you’re getting the most out of your irrigation system, while keeping utility bills low and helping to protect the environment.

Sprinklers Get Smart

The new generation of “smart” irrigation systems monitor weather, soil conditions, evaporation and plant water use and automatically adjust your watering schedule.

The secret to smart systems is the controller. Smart controllers use weather and/or site data to determine when and how long to water. Then, sprinklers apply just enough water at exactly the right time in each zone of your yard.

Smart controllers:

• Save water. Smart systems automatically suspend watering during rain, freezing or high wind conditions. Careful scheduling minimizes evaporation and encourages water to soak in, reducing the total amount of water needed. Preventing overwatering actually keeps plants healthier by encouraging stronger roots and discouraging weeds, disease and fungus growth.

• Save money. Smart systems can reduce your annual water bill by as much as 30 percent by preventing water waste. Plus, many local water providers offer rebates for purchasing specific smart controllers.

• Save time. Once an irrigation installer has programmed your site data into the smart system, the controller adjusts the watering schedule based upon weather conditions and soil moisture without manual intervention.

• Add convenience. Smart controllers adapt to seasonal weather changes without requiring reprogramming. And their “set and forget” technology is perfect for complying with any local watering restrictions, as well as for frequent travelers and vacation or second homes.

You may be able to upgrade your current irrigation system with a smart controller. Some new components are designed as easy add-ons to existing systems.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation. Learn more at www.smartirrigationmonth.org.

To find an IA-certified professional to design, install, maintain or audit your irrigation system, visit www.irrigation.org/hirecertified.